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Pamela Fox

 

Pam Fox is both artist potter and poet. She is well-known for her unique, delicate style of pottery and also for her poetry, both funny and serious. She was instrumental in the formation of the Beaudesert Bush Bards ten years ago and has been the group's president for all of that time. A love of poetry with rhyme and metre together with the fellowship of the people she meets through poetry has made this an important part of her life.

 Here's a sample:

 

 It's Amazing

 

It's really so amazing that a little navel-gazing

can produce some words of verse so erudite.

My grey cells softly humming keep the rhyme and rhythm coming

as I snuggle in my bed most every night.

 

What's really so amazing is the smoothness of my phrasing,

I am sure young William Shakespeare would be proud

to claim my faultless writing, it's so brilliant and exciting.

There is just no doubt with talent I'm endowed.

 

What's also so amazing is my standard keeps on raising

for I've conquered all the rules with discipline.

Each stanza so impeccable with chosen words delectable

Have flown with so much ease from deep within.

 

Alas, it's too amazing now that daylight comes ablazing

through my window, for my perfect poem has fled.

I'm really quite appalled to find it cannot be recalled

so I guess it's best that I remain in bed.

Pam believes that in life it is important to be in the right place at the right time. The right place for her pottery journey to commence was in Beaudesert in 1986.

She and her family moved from Stanthorpe that year and she met Hilary Rains, who had commenced pottery lessons for beginners at the showgrounds. The Beaudesert Potters Group became very strong and some excellent workshops were arranged. Pam was invited to join the group and this began a steep but enjoyable learning curve.

Over the years she has attended two Toowoomba Summer Schools with top Australian potters Greg Daly and Geoff Mincham as tutors. She also attended numerous workshops and has continually striven to develop her art. She's been a regular supporter of the Fine Arts section of the Beaudesert Show and has won several Champion trophies and awards for her work.

Pam has tried various pottery methods but the relaxation gained while throwing on the potter's wheel has made this her favourite. Because she's always enjoyed using pottery in the home, domestic ware predominates and she prefers finer rather than heavy ware.

In recent times, Pam has developed an ornamental range of bowls into which she drills intricate patterns. This is very time consuming and requires great patience - something she seems to have been blessed with. Beach walking is her favourite holiday activity, and many of her pieces are inspired by the froth and bubbles left on the beach as storm stirred waves retreat.

The highlight of Pam's hobby was when a visiting Japanese businessman asked her to make small consignments of her work for him to sell in Tokyo. One year earlier he had purchased a couple of her bowls when on a golfing trip to Kooralbyn and was sure that Japanese people would enjoy using her pottery in their homes. She felt honoured to be his featured potter and 2001 was the beginning of a four-year association which developed into a friendship.

Pam is a life member and an avid supporter of the Beaudesert Community Arts and Information Centre . She has participated in both large and small group exhibitions , but we are lucky that she now exhibits her fine work only in our Lyrebird Gallery.

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

Empty old chair

 

 Little old man on a weather worn chair,

with craggy-like features and snowy white hair;

I see him each time that I'm passing his way,

sitting alone on his porch every day.

Brief friendly greeting is all that we share,

I'd talk with him longer, had I time to spare.

 

Little old man, he is no longer there,

All I see on his porch is an empty old chair;

I feel such remorse that I didn't slow down

to hear of his life, how he'd come to our town.

How many great stories had he in his head?

They'll never be written and never be read.